ooBdoo


ooBdoo Information Network

Religion / Spiritualism

Publish your website
RSS Feed on ooBdoo

visit our publish page


All Categories:
are found here


 

 

ooBdoo Religion and Spirituality News


Click with your left mouse button, hold and scroll up and down to select news item


Latest News From Ekklesia

News Briefing and Comment
Sun, 26 Feb 2017 15:34:28 +0100


Boris Johnson urged to call for end to mass death sentences in Egypt

The Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, is in Egypt this weekend for talks with the President and Foreign Minister, according to reports.The visit comes amid concerns over abuses in Egypt, including torture and the use of the death penalty in mass trials of people who were arrested in connection to protests.

The Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, is in Egypt this weekend for talks with the President and Foreign Minister, according to reports.The visit comes amid concerns over abuses in Egypt, including torture and the use of the death penalty in mass trials of people who were arrested in connection to protests.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s Human Rights Priority Country update report on Egypt for 2016 said “Egyptian courts continued to use the death penalty,” and highlighted “the mass trial of 494 individuals on charges related to a protest that took place in August 2013, which includes Irish national Ibrahim Halawa.”

Ibrahim, who is assisted by the international human rights organisation Reprieve, was a child when he was arrested. He faces a potential death sentence, and has reported being regularly tortured.

Reprieve has raised concerns that a UK state-owned company, Northern Ireland Cooperation Overseas Ltd, has provided Egypt’s justice ministry with plans and equipment for the building of courthouses – including a juvenile court in Cairo. (http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/node/23541)

According to figures collated by Reprieve, nearly 2,000 people have received death sentences in mass trials, while nearly 900 people – including Ibrahim – continue to face the death penalty.

Harriet McCulloch, a deputy director at Reprieve, said: “Boris Johnson is visiting Egypt as thousands of people languish in horrific prison conditions, after they were arrested in connection with protests. Hundreds still face the death penalty in desperately unfair mass trials – including people who were arrested as children, like Ibrahim Halawa. The Foreign Office says it is concerned about the human rights situation in Egypt – but ministers continue to offer support to President Sisi’s government while Ibrahim’s ordeal continues. The Foreign Secretary must urge Sisi to end these appalling abuses, and free Ibrahim and the many like him.”

* Read the FCO's Human Rights Priority Country update report here

* Reprieve http://www.reprieve.org.uk/

[Ekk/4]

*


Sat, 25 Feb 2017 19:59:04 +0000

Inquiry into PIP and Motor Neurone Disease

Inquiry into PIP and Motor Neurone Disease

read more


Fri, 24 Feb 2017 13:43:02 +0000

UK workers do £33.6 billion unpaid overtime a year says TUC

UK workers gave their employers £33.6 billion of free labour last year by doing unpaid overtime, according to new analysis of official statistics by the TUC.

UK workers gave their employers £33.6 billion of free labour last year by doing unpaid overtime, according to new analysis of official statistics published today (24 February 2017)) by the Trades Union Congress (TUC).

Today is the TUC’s 13th annual Work Your Proper Hours Day. Prior to this day, the average person doing unpaid overtime has effectively worked the year so far for free.

More than 5.3 million people put in an average of 7.7 hours a week in unpaid overtime during 2016. This is equivalent to an average of £6,301 they have each missed out in their pay packets.

To mark the day, the TUC is asking workers to take a proper lunch break and leave on time. Managers could lead by example and also think about how they can move away from over-reliance on their staff’s unpaid overtime.

The TUC is warning that working time protections could be weakened after Brexit. Although the government plans to transfer EU working time rights into UK law, they will be more vulnerable to erosion and repeal by future governments. And it could lead to a weaker interpretation of the rights in UK courts than has been established in case law by the European Court of Justice.

The TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady said: “Few of us mind putting in some extra time when it’s needed. But if it happens all the time and gets taken for granted, that’s a problem. So make a stand today, take your full lunch break and go home on time.

“The best bosses understand that a long-hours culture doesn’t get good results. So we’re asking managers to set an example by leaving on time too.

“Anyone worried about the long-hours culture in their workplace should get together with workmates and join a union. That way you can get your voices heard and get the support you need to make sure your boss doesn’t break the rules.

“The government still doesn’t have a water-tight plan to stop working time protections getting weaker when we leave the EU. The Prime Minister should promise to put a guarantee into our future trade deals with Europe that British workers will have a level playing field with EU workers.”

* The TUC has designed a calculator for workers to find out how much more they would get paid each year if their unpaid overtime was paid at their usual rate.

* TUC https://www.tuc.org.uk/

[Ekk/4]


Fri, 24 Feb 2017 09:45:23 +0000

Religious leaders explore message of peace in East Africa

A consultation of church leaders from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi opened in Addis Ababa on 23 February 2017 “The peace message must be delivered to all the stakeholders, including the opposition", urged Adama Dieng, United Nations special adviser on the prevention of genocide, during the opening remarks.

A consultation of church leaders from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi opened in Addis Ababa on 23 February 2017 “The peace message must be delivered to all the stakeholders, including the opposition," urged Adama Dieng, United Nations special adviser on the prevention of genocide, during the opening remarks.

 The aim of the meeting was to reach a message of peace, he said. “What is happening today in Burundi is something we have to consider as situation to not allow to escalate. The future of Burundi belongs to Burundi and no one can save Burundi but the Burundians themselves.”

He also pointed out that the participants will need to identify viable solutions, as “church leaders have the capacities to succeed where others have failed”. He emphasised that the meeting is in line with his increasing engagement with religious leaders. He finished his speech by inviting participants to challenge each other, to hold frank talks and to be open to having a united voice.

The gathering was organised by the United Nations Office on Genocide Prevention. the Responsibility to Protect and the World Council of Churches (WCC), and was sponsored by the All Africa Conference of Churches (AACC). Participants discussed the role of the church in stabilising the Great Lakes region of Africa, with a special focus on Burundi and DRC, and on finding a peaceful solution to the current situation in these countries based on the moral and Christian imperative to promote sustainable peace among peoples and nations.

The Great Lakes region – which comprises comprises Burundi, DRC, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda – faces political and social instability. As the implementation of the 2000 Arusha Peace and Reconciliation Agreement has failed, Burundi is witnessing sociopolitical instability despite efforts by regional and sub-regional organisations, including the Great Lakes Region Commission, Eastern African Community, and the African Union to resolve the crisis. In DRC, the exit plan for the conflict resolution between the majority and the opposition parties led to a January 2017 agreement but a consensus has yet to be reached on implementation.

AACC General Secretary the Rev Dr Andre Karamaga gave a brief background to the consultation,  and Dr Nigussu Legesse, WCC programme executive, outlined the objectives of the meeting.

Legesse invited participants to analyse the current situation in Burundi and DRC, including the risk factors for atrocity crimes and their link to hate speech and incitement to violence.

He also highlighted the need to examine the role of Christian religious leaders and faith-based organisations in fuelling or preventing hate speech and incitement to violence in Burundi and DRC. The meeting served as a platform for sharing knowledge and good practices on past successes of religious leaders’ participation in the prevention and the fight against incitement to violence in the wider Great Lakes region.

* The World Council of Churches promotes Christian unity in faith, witness and service for a just and peaceful world. An ecumenical fellowship of churches founded in 1948, by the end of 2012 the WCC had 345 member churches representing more than 500 million Christians from Protestant, Orthodox, Anglican and other traditions in over 110 countries. The WCC works cooperatively with the Roman Catholic Church.

* World Council of Churches http://www.oikoumene.org/en

[Ekk/4]


Fri, 24 Feb 2017 08:54:43 +0000

Political rhetoric creates 'dangerous and divided world ' says Amnesty

.Politicians using toxic rhetoric, reminiscent of the 1930s, are creating a dangerous and divided world, said Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world yesterday.

.Politicians using toxic rhetoric, reminiscent of the 1930s, are creating a dangerous and divided world, said Amnesty International as it launched its annual assessment of human rights around the world yesterday (22 February 2017).

The Annual Report, The State of the World's Human Rights, warns that an 'us v them' narrative of blame, hate and fear is undermining the very foundations of universal human rights and leaving the global response to mass atrocities and the refugee crisis perilously weak.

Kate Allen, Director of Amnesty International UK, said: "When language around 'taking our country back' and 'making America great again' is coupled with proposals to treat EU migrants like bargaining chips or to ban refugees on the grounds of religion, it fosters deep hatred and mistrust and sends a strong message that some people are entitled to human rights and others aren't.

"This toxic rhetoric being used by politicians around the world risks taking us into a dark age of human rights and could lead to profound consequences for all of us.

"Have we forgotten that human rights protections were created after the mass atrocities of the Second World War as a way of making sure that 'never again' actually meant 'never again'?"

The report, which delivers the most comprehensive analysis of the state of human rights around the world, covering 159 countries, shows how divisive fear-mongering is having an increasingly pervasive impact in our societies.

Governments have turned on refugees and migrants: often an easy target for scapegoating. The Annual Report documents how 36 countries violated international law by sending refugees back to a country where their rights were at risk.

"We are witnessing the worst refugee crisis since the Second World War and wealthy nations like the UK and the US have shown an appalling lack of leadership and responsibility," said Kate Allen. "History will judge us for this."

In the UK, where Nigel Farage infamously unveiled a poster which showed a queue of refugees and migrants with the slogan 'Breaking Point: The EU has failed us all', the Government has shirked its responsibility for the global refugee crisis, pushing thousands of vulnerable people into the hands of people smugglers. And its decision to prematurely close the 'Dubs Amendment' scheme to bring unaccompanied refugee children already in Europe to the UK is shameful.

There was a 57 per cent spike in reporting of hate crimes in the week immediately following the EU referendum in June.

The world faces a long list of crises with little political will to address them including Syria, Yemen, Libya, Afghanistan, Central America, Central African Republic, Burundi, Iraq, South Sudan and Sudan. Amnesty International's Annual Report documented war crimes committed in at least 23 countries in 2016.

The Annual Report highlights how world leaders rolling back human rights protections and pursuing narrow self-interest is replacing multilateralism with a more aggressive, confrontational world order.

Kate Allen said: "In December, Boris Johnson talked about how Britain 'can do good for the world...in the projection of our values and our priorities'. But these values have to be questioned when the UK Government continues to supply arms to Saudi Arabia, whose coalition forces are bombing hospitals and schools in Yemen, violating international human rights and humanitarian law and possibly committing war crimes.

"And the UK Government threatening to scrap the Human Rights Act has potentially dangerous consequences worldwide with leaders of repressive regimes increasingly emboldened to scrap established human rights protections themselves."

Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International, said: "A new world order where human rights are portrayed as a barrier to national interests makes the ability to tackle mass atrocities dangerously low, leaving the door open to abuses reminiscent of the darkest times of humanity.

"The international community has already responded with deafening silence after countless atrocities in 2016; a live stream of horror from Aleppo, thousands of people killed by the police in the Philippines' 'war on drugs', use of chemical weapons and hundreds of villages burned in Darfur. The big question in 2017 will be how far the world lets atrocities go before doing something about them."

Amnesty's Annual Report documents people killed for peacefully standing up for human rights in 22 countries in 2016. The organisation is calling for mass-mobilisation against cynical efforts to roll back long-established human rights.

Kate Allen said: "Never has the fight for human rights been more urgent and more necessary. It's inspiring to see so many people around the world taking up the fight; whether it's protesting on the streets or showing the compassion that their leaders are severely lacking. History has taught us that we cannot remain silent in the face of such ugly demonisation, we must stand strong together to demand a world where human dignity and equality for all are respected."

* Read Amnesty's Annual Report, The State of the World's Human Rights here

[Ekk/4]


Thu, 23 Feb 2017 10:15:10 +0000




Methodist Church of Great Britain News Service

Methodist Church of Great Britain News Service
Sun, 26 Feb 2017 15:34:28 +0100


Booking now open for 3Generate: the Children & Youth Assembly
Children and young people will get the chance to change and challenge the church, the world and each other at this year's 3Generate
Fri, 15 Jun 2012 01:26:25 GMT

Stop blaming the poor for poverty, say Churches
New proposals seek to measure 'faults' of poor, rather than poverty
Thu, 14 Jun 2012 01:26:25 GMT

Reshaping for leadership of the Connexional Team
The leadership structures of the Connexional Team will be significantly re-shaped under recommendations from a reference group of the Methodist Council
Fri, 08 Jun 2012 01:26:25 GMT

Fijian Church given permission to meet
The Methodist Church in Britain has welcomed the news that the Methodist Church in Fiji and Rotuma has been granted permission by the Government to hold its annual Conference
Fri, 08 Jun 2012 01:26:25 GMT

CTE Presidents' Statement on the Jubilee
The Presidents of Churches Together in England have issued a joint press release for the Queen's Diamond Jubilee. It is for all churches and community groups celebrating the Jubilee this weekend. It can be read out in churches, posted on websites, put in literature and passed through social media.
Wed, 30 May 2012 01:26:25 GMT


Want to see your syndicated content ptblished here?e

Tell a friend about this page


Use of this site constitutes your acceptance of our Legal & Privacy Notice including Cookies | Feedback | Advertise on ooBdoo | Back To Our Home Page

ooBdoo is not associated with or endorsed by any of the linked sites on this page nor are any of the linked sites on this page associated with or endorsed by ooBdoo.
ooBdoo name, design and associated marks are trade marks (™) and / or registered trade marks (®) of Inter-Change Media Ltd. Copyright 2017 Inter-Change Media Ltd
All Rights Reserved

 

Inter-Change Media Ltd